The Motivator

There are many motivations people have for sitting down to write: to express frustration, to describe something beautiful, to record ideas and concepts for posterity. I made a short video a while back entitled Fiction as Light which touched on some of the reasons why I write. But as far as the day to day motivation, sometimes the big picture is hard to see and you have to find practical, nose-to-the-grindstone reasons for hacking out another thousand words or editing and re-working that chapter for the fifth time.

Right now I’m knee deep in the first draft of my next book. And for me, writing as I do using the software program “Scrivener” (which I wrote about in this post), one of my secret weapons in the battle to stay motivated and to soldier on is the “Project Target” window, but which for me might be more aptly called “The Motivator”. It looks like this:

more here - The Motivator | djedwardson.com.

Scrivener pressure

I love using Scrivener. Love all the different bells and whistles. The way I can flip between chapters, access all my research and character notes with just a click of the mouse on a file in the sidebar. It’s great. Scrivener also has a fun feature called Targets. I use it to motivate myself to keep going, to get to the target for the day. But lately I’ve noticed a darker side to using this feature that I never paid much attention to before Scrivener.

more here - Scrivener pressure :: Carolyne Aarsen.

3 more reasons why Scrivener makes writing a book easy

Two weeks ago I blogged about how Scrivener was helping me to imagine all kinds of structural possibilities for my novel, because of the way it made setting up and manipulating the ordering of the scenes in my book so easy. This week, I’m going to cover off three other features of Scrivener that I love, and that are making me want to spend more and more time writing my book.

more here - 3 more reasons why Scrivener makes writing a book easy | While the kids are sleeping.

Word count targets with Keyboard Maestro

One of the many neat little things about Scrivener is its ability to set “target” word counts. Personally I waffle about what amount to shoot for all the time—my current feeling is that 500 is a good minimum because it’s fairly easily achievable (even easily surpassable).

But, I’m frequently not writing in Scrivener. Blog posts like this one tend to be written in Byword, and lately I’ve been using Ulysses 3 for shorter fiction. (Scrivener’s ability to serve as a collection bin for all kinds of research bits still gives it an edge over U3 for, well, long stuff that needs research bits.)

I realized not too long ago that I could hack together a “daily word count” system with Keyboard Maestro. It’s not as elegant as Scrivener’s; it doesn’t reset automatically, and it doesn’t give you neat progress bars. But it gets the job as I need it done.

more here - Coyote Tracks – Word count targets with Keyboard Maestro.

3 more reasons why Scrivener makes writing a book easy

Two weeks ago I blogged about how Scrivener was helping me to imagine all kinds of structural possibilities for my novel, because of the way it made setting up and manipulating the ordering of the scenes in my book so easy. This week, I’m going to cover off three other features of Scrivener that I love, and that are making me want to spend more and more time writing my book.

more here - 3 more reasons why Scrivener makes writing a book easy | While the kids are sleeping.

Setting targets in Scrivener

If a tour of Scrivener is a stretch for an hour’s workshop, it’s certainly far too much for a blog post.  But one feature at a time, now that’s doable.  So let’s start with one of my favorites, Project Targets.  This little widget floats anywhere on your screen.  Depending on your point of view, and/or your progress on your manuscript, it will either inspire you or kick your butt (hopefully into gear).

more here - Kay Hudson | Writing Romance with a Sense of Humor and a Twist of the Unexpected.

How Best To Use The Target Tracker In Scrivener

Word targets are the life-blood of the full-time writer. A novel is a big piece of work and if your only milestone is the completion of it, then you’re going to get lost up your own fountain pen. The only sensible way to track progress is by setting yourself a daily word target and, as usual, Scrivener provides the perfect tool.

via How Best To Use The Target Tracker In Scrivener | Michael J Holley – Writer.

Tracking progress with Scrivener

There’s a handy little thing called Project Targets that I’ve fallen in love with, and is perfectly suited for writing to a deadline. I can say which days I want to write (fancy that, taking a day off), and when I want to be at my target word count and it figures out (because math is hard) to tell me how many words I need to write per session — or day — to reach that goal.

via Tracking progress w/Scrivener « Team Weaveworld.